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20121201
20121231
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SFGTV2 282
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 282 (some duplicates have been removed)
as a prototype for many american cities, including pittsburgh and new york. man: new york city went to philadelphia and said, "you know, we're thinking of developing a hudson river water supply -- what do you suggest we do?" and they said, "we've had "a lot of problems on the schuylkill. "don't go to the hudson river. go to the upland and work by gravity." and that's what new york city did. they first went to the hudson highlands, but 150 years later, it went to the delaware highlands. and really diverted the water that normally went to philadelphia to new york city. i don't think they anticipated that. narrator: the majority of new york city's drinking water comes from watersheds in upstate new york. a watershed is the area of land where water from rain or snow melt drains downhill into a body of water. mountains act as a funnel to feed rivers and lakes. and in this case, reservoirs. in the new york city system, water is collected and stored in 19 reservoirs, which can hold more than a year's supply -- over 580 billion gallons of water. almost all of the system is fed by gravity, w
, little charlotte. he moved to new york city in 1948, where benny goodman hire him and he became very famous in new york at the time and he died in new york in 2001. one of the pieces of my ticket to ride is how many cubans of irish ancestry are there. because this connected to my family, that's why i wanted to read it to you. in the 40's, my father moved to new york in search of his destiny. he learned to make brillantine in red, blue and golden colors to give a beautiful sheen to the hair. in his spare time, when he could break free from his alchemist's captive vit, he would go listen to cuban music at the park plaza hotel in manhattan. those were happy times and years later became a happy tomic with me, convinced early on that my father inhabited a magic world. a few years ago, while listening to a recording of cuban blues by chico, i remembered in new york in those stories of the 40's that chico and my father met at club cuba in manhattan and again in havana in the mid-50's. the sessions of chico's house in our neighborhood became so famous that even my father, not particularly fo
scale and complex engineering. man: water is essential to the economic viability of new york city. reliable infrastructure and reliable delivery of water is a must. you have to reinvest in the infrastructure every single minute to keep it current. hurwitz: we have the stock exchange, we have the united nations -- failure can have a dramatic impact on the nation, and even internationally. so there's a really keen awareness that you always have to be fixing the system. things corrode, they rust. they get to where you turn them on and nothing happens. but it is so totally used in every nook and cranny, that making any accommodation to shut it down, to do something to it, is very difficult. narrator: two massive underground tunnels, called simply tunnel 1 and tunnel 2, provide most of the city's water supply. they run hundreds of feet below manhattan, far deeper than the subways. built at the beginning of the 20th century, they are concrete-lined and bored through solid rock. they could last centuries. but the mechanical equipment within them will not. engineers in the 1950s discovere
that if they closed the valves for tunnel inspections, they may never open again, leaving new york city without water. so they chose to keep them open. as a result, there has not been significant inspection, maintenance, or repair of the tunnels in decades. no one knows their current condition. hurwitz: currently, city tunnel 1 and city tunnel number 2 would be feeding each half of the city. so you'd lose half the city if you didn't have a replacement. narrator: without half of its water supply, the city would shut down. for nearly 40 years, new york has been in the process of constructing a solution. man: this project is water tunnel number 3. we started on this project in 1969. i'm a sandhog. i've been a sandhog for 37 years. narrator: sandhogs are the men of local 147, who work deep below the city. they began building the infrastructure of new york in 1872. from the subways to the sewers, the water tunnels to the highway tunnels, new york city thrives because of their work. ryan: you got one little hole in the ground, and nobody knows we're here. see the empire state building, right. that's 1,000
in the morning so nobody does not have to go to school for two weeks, michael age 13 from long island, new york. >> free medical care for everyone, dorothy, age 72, new york, new york. >> i wish for all of the lonely people in the world to find happiness. daniel, steele, the author. >> i wish that we could bring all of our soldiers home now, anonomous. >> thank you, everyone. >> you can't make that stuff up, i tell you that was incredible, i know when the mayor leaves town they appoint a mayor for the day and i think that hannah should be the supervisor for the day when scott is out of town, thank you, hannah. >> okay, if you are following your program, throw it away or take it home with you so you know who was here today but he always have to change things around a little bit. i am thrilled that we have the mayor with us and we have the council general of j
we consider the modern elevator is the elevator with a safety device that was built in new york in 1853 in response to a freight elevator accident in new york city. until that time, elevators were quite common in buildings but typically used just for handling freight. elisha otis -- elijah otis successfully demonstrated the safety device he had created. even of the elevator and he cut the device, and he did not fall. everyone was impressed by that. in 1857, the oldest brother's company installed their first passenger elevator on broadway in new york. believe it or not, many of those first elevators were actually started and stopped by a hand broke. >> what drove those old elevators? what was their motive power? >> in some cases, they might have even been hp. >> and then changed to electric? >> electric cited to come in the 1890's, and that was around the time when the elevator stopped from material handling and started to be used more frequently for passengers. in 1878, there was a demonstration of the other thing that allowed architects to build taller buildings was the advent
we control the market driven licenses, perhaps? you hear of a license is going for sale in new york or new jersey for half a million dollars. that makes a small-business man like me, that boggles my mind. and it boggles my mind to think i might have to go up to two hundred thousand dollars. what is the likelihood of the supply increasing to meet the demand? the city is growing. in south beach, there are cranes everywhere. we will need these licenses. how will we get them? >> i can repeat what i just said, but in part, that is something that we need to have pushed from the local. right now, there is a bill applying to napa. i'm sorry, marin county. it is the same sort of problem. part of the argument is -- just like i it was a kid coming in, people come in from all over the area to eat in san francisco restaurants. they come from all over the world. again, this governor is going to support everyone locally. i lot of that will have to come from you to accomplish what is right for the city. how do we do that? >> [unintelligible] >> i blame these guys for conditions. this time, i will b
in or leaving new york city and i had the book and had martinis and we read the book together and you loved one line "female criminals can be unwidely uncunning" and we had that conversation about why airportings never have clocks and after that i saw you two times and more sorrow and the first is when you family were in the gold country and i met you there before we went back to our house. although it was summer rain pored all day long. the pewter sky was inseparable from the horizon and you my brother and by that time were also becoming inseparable from the horizons of your illness and the line between you it and were blurring. it was during that first visit i understood that you would die and not eventually but sooner than that you. you were in a wheel care and -- chair and we waited while abbey and the boys got the care. it's the first time we were alone together. as the rain drummed i turned to you and saw that you were crying, crying silently not moving and i reflected then how curious it was before i never seen a person cry in this alarming manner silently and letsing the tears
, thank you for coming. i represent about 30 or 40 entertainment venues in san francisco, new york, and moscow is. i have a technical question about county transfers. -- and lost vegas. i have a technical question about county transfers. right now, there are very few buildings that you can lease in san francisco anymore. this town has gone nuts in the last five or six months. there are no liquor licenses to purchase. i have strong connections with the liquor licenses on line and some of these people. i am sorry that the top of the list. i have 48 license requests that i cannot fail. i have a two-star michelin restaurant that is moving from downtown out into the mission that the only thing i can do is throw a quick 41 on the place because we can -- because i cannot find a 47 or 848 to do it. i would like you -- or a 48 to do it. i would like to think about some injured county transfers. -- enter-county transfers. there are a lot of restaurants that have a million dollar construction costs and cannot find a license and are freaking out. licensing has gone to about 128,000 this month.
to all ages. when i was a kid growing up in new york, and we used to -- there is a statement, saving my ass. [laughter] if there is a question i hope you do not look at it as a challenge. i think it is a feeling. there are quite a few events in the park. it is really about managing them and making sure that your outreach is good. i would like to work together, wherever you are. i want to thank our panelists. i hope that you will as well. [applause] i hope that that gave you some food for thought, the idea here about things that we will talk about in the breakouts. we have got some food and beverage out there. i know that we have drinks, cookies, even sandwiches. it should be in room a, one of our breakout sessions. take this opportunity to use the west -- the restaurant and find your own way. thank you. -- rest room and find your own way. thank you.
with. [applause] i would also like to welcome former governor from new york patacky and thank you for your leadership. over the next days you will learn about sustainable practices. you will network with the greatest minds in the industry and enjoy your time here. be thoughtful. be creative and go out and lead the befl energy and green policies for the rest of the country. congratulations and thanks for being here in san francisco. [applause] >> hi, thank you all for coming here today. i am the costume and textiles creator here at the fine arts museum. it is make great honor to introduce, to present this program today. just a few things come out of respect, photography is allowed, but no flash photography. we will be taking questions from the audience, and you can submit your questions either through twitter or e-mail, and we also handed out cards to you when you arrived. the questions will happen at the end of the program. if you are not planning to tweet or e-mail, please turn your cellphone off. again, it is my great honor to have this program and conversation between susie
in the world that do that. new york, toronto, and berlin. i have been to all three and they are not nearly the same size as well we produced, or nearly as diverse. what we are always thinking about is what we are offering people that is so quintessentially san francisco that we get -- it cannot be gotten anywhere else. we are also told the switching of the entertainment this year. we have dance areas where the slides used to be. i think that for us it is about making sure that people, even if they came to san francisco in particular five years ago, that they are not experiencing the fight -- the same thing. it speaks to one of the priorities. the never-ending city. or something. i do not remember, exactly, but it is the same basic concept. even if you come here several times over and over, you will not have the same experience. as we do that, enhancing certain things. live stages have big-name bands. headlining the folsom street fair, people are now looking forward to our entertainment in ways they did not 10 years ago. >> commander, how do we prepared to assist an outdoor event? what trai
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 282 (some duplicates have been removed)